This course is a podcast episode

You can listen to this course for free on most podcast players (Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, etc.). Once you have listened to the episode / course you can access the post-test and earn your certificate / ASHA CEUs using the links above.




Course Description and Learning Objectives

Let’s hear a Woot! Woot! (with an emphasis on the OT) for this week’s episode featuring Instagrammers and AAC enthusiasts, Mara Jonet, Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP) and Annabeth Knight, Occupational Therapist (OT) of The Fanny Pack Therapist. This collaborative duo shares their tips and experiences tackling AAC assessment and intervention through the evidence-based practice of interdisciplinary collaboration. Learn how to utilize creative partnerships with your friendly neighborhood OT to fill the gaps in and expand the borders of your scope of competence in AAC service delivery for children with complex needs. Annabeth and Mara are a shining example of “paying it forward” as they describe strategies for creating a mutually beneficial partnership that lends unparalleled benefits for clients and professionals alike. Even Mabel the dog is listening, and so should you! You can learn more about Mara and Annabeth here.

Summary Written by Tanna Neufeld, MS, CCC-SLP, Contributing Editor

Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify at least 3 resources which provide evidence supporting an interdisciplinary collaboration approach in evaluation and treatment for children with complex communication needs.

  2. Describe 3 unique roles of each the OT and SLP throughout the AAC and AT service provision process.

  3. Explore gaps in basic competencies for AAC practitioners, and learn at least 4 tangible strategies for enabling practitioner growth through training and collaboration.  



Course Presenters

SLP/BCBA; SLP Kate Grandbois (she/her) & Amy Wonkka (she/her

Kate and Amy are co-founders of SLP Nerdcast. Kate is a dually certified SLP / BCBA who works primarily as an "AAC Specialist." She owns a private practice with a focus on interdisciplinary collaboration, augmentative alternative communication intervention and assessment, and consultation. Amy is an SLP who also works as an "AAC Specialist" in a public school setting. Amy's primary interests are AAC, typical language development, motor speech, phonology, data collection, collaboration, coaching, and communication partner training and support.

Annabeth Knight, OTD, OTR/L

Annabeth is an occupational therapist who has been working in pediatrics for nine years in a variety of settings, specializing in assistive technology assessment for children with multiple neuromuscular conditions. Annabeth received her clinical doctorate in occupational therapy, researching the topic of improving quality of life of children with cerebral palsy through caregiver education and empowerment.

Mara Jonet, MA, CCC-SLP

Mara is a speech-language pathologist who has worked in outpatient pediatrics for five years. Mara has always loved AAC, so she centered her graduate school and work experiences around complex communication needs.

Speaker Disclosures

Mara Jonet financial disclosures: Mara is employed as a speech language pathologist working in AAC. Mara Jonet’s non-financial disclosures: Mara runs the Instagram account, @thefannypacktherapist, which provides free information on collaborative AAC practice and a minimalist approach to pediatric therapy.

Annabeth Knight financial disclosures: Annabeth is employed as an OT working in AAC. Annabeth Knight non-financial disclosures: Annabeth runs the Instagram account, @thefannypacktherapist, which provides free information on collaborative AAC practice and a minimalist approach to pediatric therapy.

Kate Grandbois financial disclosures: Kate is the owner / founder of Grandbois Therapy + Consulting, LLC and co-founder of SLP Nerdcast.  Kate Grandbois non-financial disclosures: Kate is a member of ASHA, SIG 12, and serves on the AAC Advisory Group for Massachusetts Advocates for Children. She is also a member of the Berkshire Association for Behavior Analysis and Therapy (BABAT), MassABA, the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI) and the corresponding Speech Pathology and Applied Behavior Analysis SIG. 

Amy Wonkka financial disclosures:  Amy is an employee of a public school system and co-founder for SLP Nerdcast.   Amy Wonkka non-financial disclosures: Amy is a member of ASHA, SIG 12, and serves on the AAC Advisory Group for Massachusetts Advocates for Children.



References & Resources

American Occupational Therapy Association. (2010). Specialized knowledge and skills in technology and environmental interventions for occupational therapy practice American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 64.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2016). Scope of practice in speech-language pathology [Scope of Practice]. Available from www.asha.org/policy/.

Angelo, J., & Smith, R. (1989). The critical role of occupational therapy in augmentative and alternative communication services. In Technology review 1989: Perspective on occupational therapy practice(pp. 49-53). Rockville, MD: American Occupational  Therapy Association. 

Brady, N., Bruce, S., Goldman, A., Erickson, K., Mineo, B., Ogletree, B., . . . Wilkinson, K. (2016). Communication services and supports for individuals with severe disabilities: Guidance for assessment and intervention. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 121, 121-138.

Copley, J., & Ziviani, J. (2007). Use of a team-based approach to assistive technology assessment and planning for children with multiple disabilities: a pilot study. Assistive Technology, 19, 109-125.

Cunningham, B. (2014). Rethinking occupational therapy’s role with assistive technology. OT Practice,19(11), CE-1-CE-7. 

Dukhovny, E., & Kelly, E. B. (2015). Practical resources for provision of services to culturally and linguistically diverse users of AAC. Perspectives on Cultural and Linguistic Diversity, 22, 25–39.

Farber, J.G., & Goldstein, M.K. (1998). Parents working with speech-language pathologists to foster partnerships in  education. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, (29), 24-35.

Hill, K., & Corsi, V. (2012). Role of speech-language pathologists in assistive technology assessments. In S. Federici & M. J. Scherer (Eds.), Assistive technology assessment handbook (pp. 301–327). Boca Raton. FL: CRC Press.

Lahm, E.A., Bell, J.K., & Blackhurst, A.E. (2002). Using interdisciplinary teams: University of Kentucky Assistive Technology (UKAT) toolkit. Retrieved from      

http://edsrc.coe.uky.edu/www/ukatii/resources/index.html 

Moyers, P.A., & Metzler, C.A. (2014). Health Policy Perspectives-Interprofessional collaborative Practice in care coordination. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68, 500-505. 

National Joint Committee for the Communication Needs of Persons With Severe Disabilities. (1992). Guidelines for meeting the communication needs of persons with severe disabilities [Guidelines]. Available from www.asha.org/policy or www.asha.org/njc.

Orentlicher, M.L., Handley, M., Ehrenberg, R., Frenkel, M., & Markowitz, L. (2014). Interprofessional collaboration in schools: a review of current evidence. Early Intervention & School Special Interest Section Quarterly, 21(2), 1-3. 

Parette, H. P., VanBiervliet, A., & Hourcade, J. J. (2000). Family-centered decision making in assistive technology. Journal of Special Education Technology, 15, 45–55.

Polgar, J.M. (2006). Assistive technology as an enabler to occupation: What’s old is new again. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 73, 199-204. 

Post, K.M. (2009, September). Advancing your knowledge and skills in assistive technology.  Technology Special Interest Section Quarterly, 19(3), 1-4. 

Skuller, J. (2017). Interprofessional education in an assistive technology program for children with special needs. OT Practice, 22(14), 12–16.

Topia, M., & Hocking, C. (2012). Enabling development and participation through early provision of  augmentative and alternative communication. New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, 59, 24-30. 

Wallis, S; Bloch, SJ; Clarke, M; (2017) Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) training provision for professionals in England. Journal of Enabling Technologies , 11 (3) pp. 101-112. 

Zangari, C., & Kangas, K. (1997). Intervention principles and procedures. In L. Lloyd, D. Fuller, & H. Arvidson (Eds.), Augmentative and alternative communication (pp. 235–253). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.



Time Ordered Agenda

10 minutes: Introduction, Disclaimers and Disclosures

20 minutes:  Descriptions of resources which provide evidence supporting an interdisciplinary collaboration approach in evaluation and treatment for children with complex communication needs.

15 minutes:  Descriptions of unique roles of each the OT and SLP throughout the AAC and AT service provision process 

10 minutes:  Descriptions of basic competencies for AAC practitioners, and learn at least 4 tangible strategies for enabling practitioner growth through training and collaboration  

5 minutes: Summary and Closing



Disclaimer

The contents of this episode are not meant to replace clinical advice.  SLP Nerdcast, its hosts and guests do not represent or endorse specific products or procedures mentioned during our episodes unless otherwise stated.  We are NOT PhDs, but we do research our material.  We do our best to provide a thorough review and fair representation of each topic that we tackle.  That being said, it is always likely that there is an article we’ve missed, or another perspective that isn’t shared.  If you have something to add to the conversation, please email us! Wed love to hear from you!

Credits: 

Summary Written by Tanna Neufeld, MS, CCC-SLP, Contributing Editor

Audio File Editing provided by Caitlan Akier, MA, CCC-SLP/L, Contributing Editor

Promotional Content provided by Ashley Sturgis, MA, CCC-SLP, Contributing Editor 

Web Editing provided by Sinead Rogazzo, MS, CCC-SLP, Contributing Editor


 

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