This course is a podcast episode.

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In lieu of a handout....

We offer you the article published on the PrAACtical AAC Blog

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

We were lucky enough to publish an article for the incredible blog, PrAACtical AAC.  If you interact with augmentative alternative communication (AAC) at all in your clinical work this blog contains a wealth of information.   This episode is meant to be an auditory companion to the original article published on July 6th, 2020.   Below is a brief excerpt from that article:

Most SLPs working in AAC have come across a variety of different interventions in their practice.  Some, like aided language modeling, are popular and commonly seen at conferences. They are the most popular option on the intervention buffet.  Others, like discrete trial training, are like the mystery meat – you think you know what it is, you don’t think you’re going to like it, and you’re going to watch while someone else tries it first. Sometimes these teaching procedures are straightforward, and sometimes they are confusing, intimidating, or complicated.  You may find that choosing which intervention to use is influenced by your goals, your workplace norms, or the direct needs of the AAC user; but when it comes down to actually implementing that intervention it can feel like a very complicated experience.  What is the intervention supposed to look like? What materials should I use? What goals are going to be supported by this intervention?  How am I possibly going to take data on this while I’m also trying to do therapy?  It can feel like a doozy, and we hear you.  Our goal for this episode is to demystify the main item on the intervention buffet and give a “how to” for implementation. 

  1. Define aided language modeling and describe how it is differentiated from instructional modeling
  2. Identify strategies for planning for and implementing aided modeling interventions
  3. Identify strategies for collecting stakeholder input and generalizing aided modeling interventions to novel environments


Course Presenters

SLP/BCBA; SLP Kate Grandbois (she/her) & Amy Wonkka (she/her

Kate and Amy are co-founders of SLP Nerdcast. Kate is a dually certified SLP / BCBA who works primarily as an "AAC Specialist." She owns a private practice with a focus on interdisciplinary collaboration, augmentative alternative communication intervention and assessment, and consultation. Amy is an SLP who also works as an "AAC Specialist" in a public school setting. Amy's primary interests are AAC, typical language development, motor speech, phonology, data collection, collaboration, coaching, and communication partner training and support.

Speaker Disclosures

Kate Grandbois financial disclosures: Kate is the owner / founder of Grandbois Therapy + Consulting, LLC and co-founder of SLP Nerdcast. Kate Grandbois non-financial disclosures: Kate is a member of ASHA, SIG 12, and serves on the AAC Advisory Group for Massachusetts Advocates for Children. She is also a member of the Berkshire Association for Behavior Analysis and Therapy (BABAT), MassABA, the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI) and the corresponding Speech Pathology and Applied Behavior Analysis SIG. 

Amy Wonkka financial disclosures: Kate is an employee of a public school system and co-founder of SLP Nerdcast.  Amy Wonkka non-financial disclosures: Amy is a member of ASHA, SIG 12, and serves on the AAC Advisory Group for Massachusetts Advocates for Children.



Time Ordered Agenda

10 minutes: Introductions and disclosures

10 minutes: Discussion of aided language modeling and describe how it is differentiated from instructional modeling

20 minutes: Discussions of strategies for planning for and implementing aided modeling interventions

15 minutes: Discussions of strategies for collecting stakeholder input and generalizing aided modeling interventions to novel environments

5 minutes: Overview, discussion, and closing



References and Resources

Allen, A., Schlosser, R., Brock, K., Shane, H. (2017). The effectiveness of aided augmented input techniques for persons with developmental disabilities: a systematic review.  Augmentative Alternative Communication, 33(3), 149-159.

Binger, C., & Light, J. (2007). The effect of aided AAC modeling on the expression of multi-symbol messages by preschoolers who use AAC. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 23(1), 30–43. doi: 10.1080/07434610600807470.

Cafiero, J. M. (2001). The effect of an augmentative communication intervention on the communication, behavior, and academic program of an adolescent with autism. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 16(3), 179–189. doi: 10.1177/108835760101600306.

Drager, D. R., Postal, V. J., Carrolus, L., Castellano, M., Gagliano, C., & Glynn, J. (2006). The effect of aided language modeling on symbol comprehension and production in 2 preschoolers with autism. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 15(2), 112-125.

Goossens,’ C. (1989). Aided communication intervention before assessment: a case study of a child with cerebral palsy. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 5(1), 14–26. doi: 10.1080/07434618912331274926.

Kraat, A. W. (1985). Communication interaction between aided and natural speakers: A state of the art report. Madison, WI: Trace Center Reprint Service. Retrieved from http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/contentde-livery/servlet/ERICServlet?accno=ED287275

Romski M.A., & Sevcik R.A. (2003). Augmented input: Enhancing communication development. In Light JC, Beukelman DR, Reichle J, editors. Communicative competence for individuals who use AAC: From research to effective practice. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes; 2003. pp. 147–162.

Sennott, S. C., Light, J. C., & McNaughton, D. (2016). AAC modeling intervention research review. Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities, 41(2), 101-115. https://doi.org/10.1177/1540796916638822

Sevcik, R. A., Romski, M. A., Watkins, R. V., & Deffebach, K. P. (1995). Adult partner-augmented communication input to youth with mental retardation using the System for Augmenting Language (SAL). Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 38(4), 902–912. doi: 10.1044/jshr.3804.902


Our original blog post on PrAACtical AAC: https://praacticalaac.org/praactical/aactual-therapy-using-aided-language-modeling/



Disclaimer

The contents of this episode are not meant to replace clinical advice.  SLP Nerdcast, its hosts and guests do not represent or endorse specific products or procedures mentioned during our episodes unless otherwise stated.  We are NOT PhDs, but we do research our material.  We do our best to provide a thorough review and fair representation of each topic that we tackle.  That being said, it is always likely that there is an article we’ve missed, or another perspective that isn’t shared.  If you have something to add to the conversation, please email us! We'd love to hear from you!





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