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Course Description & Learning Outcomes

As the resident SLP Nerdcasters, we are doing our best to bring you interviews and other content that aligns with your learning needs and enhances your practice.  Turns out sometimes that content scratches an itch deep inside our nerd brains and leads us on a crazy, sometimes circuitous, quest to learn more.  Perhaps we read an article, which leads us to another article, rinse and repeat, over and over and over and…we have a conversation about said articles, and another conversation, and another...you get the idea.  Sometimes the SLP Nerd in question’s name rhymes with plate.  Sometimes it rhymes with plamy.  We’ll let you be the judge of which SLP Nerd was afflicted with the “Curse of the Article Hole” in this instance, but rest assured, this was one of those times.

So what is probe data anyway, and why do you care about it?  Why did we care about it so much?  For starters, it can make data collection easier.  It can also make the analysis and interpretation of that data easier (and what is the point in collecting data if you aren’t actually going to review it and think about what it means for your client?).  Think about the possibilities!  If a clinician doesn’t have to spend so much time and focus collecting data, they free up a lot of bandwidth to engage in authentic interactions with their clients!  BUT - in our reading we found some interesting information that may lead you to make certain choices about the manner in which you collect the probe data.  It turns out not all probe data is created equal.  We found there are a lot of variables to consider, and by making informed choices about the frequency and type of data you collect, you can make it much more likely that your probe data is a better estimate of your client’s true performance.

Tune in and learn more about probe data, including the questions you didn’t even know you should be asking.  Even better if you find yourself at the end of the episode with an itchy SLP Nerd brain, a plan for good data collection, and more time to focus on client interactions!

Learning Outcomes

  1. Define continuous and discontinuous data collection 

  2. Identify variations on trial-based probe/discontinuous data that may be more likely yield “good data”

  3. Describe clinical scenarios in which one approach may be better than another



Course Presenters

SLP/BCBA; SLP

Kate Grandbois (she/her) & Amy Wonkka (she/her

Kate and Amy are co-founders of SLP Nerdcast. Kate is a dually certified SLP / BCBA who works primarily as an "AAC Specialist." She owns a private practice with a focus on interdisciplinary collaboration, augmentative alternative communication intervention and assessment, and consultation. Amy is an SLP who also works as an "AAC Specialist" in a public school setting. Amy's primary interests are AAC, typical language development, motor speech, phonology, data collection, collaboration, coaching, and communication partner training and support.

Speaker Disclosures

Kate Grandbois financial disclosures: Kate is the owner / founder of Grandbois Therapy + Consulting, LLC and co-founder of SLP Nerdcast.
Kate Grandbois non-financial disclosures: Kate is a member of ASHA, SIG 12, and serves on the AAC Advisory Group for Massachusetts Advocates for Children. She is also a member of the Berkshire Association for Behavior Analysis and Therapy (BABAT), MassABA, the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI) and the corresponding Speech Pathology and Applied Behavior Analysis SIG. 

Amy Wonkka financial disclosures: Amy is an employee of a public school system and co-founder for SLP Nerdcast.
Amy Wonkka non-financial disclosures: Amy is a member of ASHA, SIG 12, and serves on the AAC Advisory Group for Massachusetts Advocates for Children.



Time Ordered Agenda

10 minutes: Introduction, Disclaimers and Disclosures

20 minutes:  Descriptions of continuous and discontinuous data collection 

15 minutes:  Descriptions of variations on trial-based probe/discontinuous data that may be more likely yield “good data”

10 minutes:  Descriptions of clinical scenarios in which one approach may be better than another

5 minutes: Summary and Closing



References & Resources

Cooper, J., Heron, T., & Heward, W. (2020). Applied Behavior Analysis. Harlow: Pearson Education UK.

Cummings, A. R., & Carr, J. E. (2009). Evaluating Progress In Behavioral Programs For Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders Via Continuous And Discontinuous Measurement. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 42(1), 57-71. doi:10.1901/jaba.2009.42-57

Fiske, K., & Delmolino, L. (2012). Use of Discontinuous Methods of Data Collection in Behavioral Intervention: Guidelines for Practitioners. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 5(2), 77-81. doi:10.1007/bf03391826

Lerman, D. C., Dittlinger, L. H., Fentress, G., & Lanagan, T. (2011). A Comparison of Methods for Collecting Data on Performance During Discrete Trial Teaching. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 4(1), 53-62. doi:10.1007/bf03391775

Najdowski, A. C., Chilingaryan, V., Bergstrom, R., Granpeesheh, D., Balasanyan, S., Aguilar, B., . . . Roane, H. (2009). Comparison Of Data-Collection Methods In A Behavioral Intervention Program For Children With Pervasive Developmental Disorders: A Replication. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis,42(4), 827-832. doi:10.1901/jaba.2009.42-827



Disclaimer

The contents of this episode are not meant to replace clinical advice.  SLP Nerdcast, its hosts and guests do not represent or endorse specific products or procedures mentioned during our episodes unless otherwise stated.  We are NOT PhDs, but we do research our material.  We do our best to provide a thorough review and fair representation of each topic that we tackle.  That being said, it is always likely that there is an article we’ve missed, or another perspective that isn’t shared.  If you have something to add to the conversation, please email us! We'd love to hear from you!


This course is offered for .1 ASHA CEU (Advanced level, Professional area)



Reviews

5 star rating

Probe Data

Lynn Smallwood

Gives a lot to think about

Gives a lot to think about

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5 star rating

Great course!

Lauren Pascucci

I loved this course. It confirmed that my switch last year to discontinuous data was working smarter not harder and not just me being overwhelmed or lazy. Af...

Read More

I loved this course. It confirmed that my switch last year to discontinuous data was working smarter not harder and not just me being overwhelmed or lazy. After this past year, I appreciated a little affirmation that I didn’t screw something up.

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5 star rating

I am intrigued by discontinuous data

Kaitlyn Zaloga

I learned SO MUCH from this course and can't wait to try out what I learned when it comes to my data collection. Discontinuous data will be SO BENEFICIAL for...

Read More

I learned SO MUCH from this course and can't wait to try out what I learned when it comes to my data collection. Discontinuous data will be SO BENEFICIAL for groups with varying goals/objectives. I no longer have to feel like I'm staring at my data points the entire time.

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